Body Art Convention



body art convention

Face and Body Art International Convention Orlando 2009



Autobiographical Comics


Autobiographical Comics


$71.9


A troubled childhood in Iran. Living with a disability. Grieving for a dead child. Over the last forty years the comic book has become an increasingly popular way of telling personal stories of considerable complexity and depth. In Autobiographical Comics: Life Writing in Pictures, Elisabeth El Refaie offers a long overdue assessment of the key conventions, formal properties, and narrative patterns of this fascinating genre. The book considers eighty-five works of North American and European provenance, works that cover a broad range of subject matters and employ many different artistic styles. Drawing on concepts from several disciplinary fields-including semiotics, literary and narrative theory, art history, and psychology-El Refaie shows that the traditions and formal features of comics provide new possibilities for autobiographical storytelling. For example, the requirement to produce multiple drawn versions of one’s self necessarily involves an intense engagement with physical aspects of identity, as well as with the cultural models that underpin body image. The comics medium also offers memoirists unique ways of representing their experience of time, their memories of past events, and their hopes and dreams for the future. Furthermore, autobiographical comics creators are able to draw on the close association in contemporary Western culture between seeing and believing in order to persuade readers of the authentic nature of their stories.

Consuming Fashion


Consuming Fashion


$2.05


Clothing the body is one of the most complicated acts of daily existence. When a nun ponders red shoes, an architect knots his bowtie, a lesbian laces her Doc Marten’s, or a nude model disrobes, each is engaging in a process of identity-making that is both intensely personal and deeply social. In an increasingly material world, negotiating dress codes is a nuanced art, informed by shifting patterns of power and authority, play and performance, as well as gender, sexuality, class, ethnicity and race. Drawing on ethnographic knowledge to connect theory and practice, authors reveal links between material culture, social and economic forces and personal performance – from trade beads to Barbie, and from Taiwanese producer to Nike consumer – to explain clothing choices through time and across cultures. Conventional understandings of the self, subject and society are shown to be inadequate when examining the interconnections of cultural and transnational economic systems of production and consumption that have a profound effect on human choice. Social climates in which dress accrues meaning are increasingly global climates, where women’s bodies are commodified, gender categories are rigidly bound, and sweatshop labourers are slaves to boundless consumer appetite. This interdisciplinary book represents an important contribution to a fascinating and contested realm of human experience, and will be indispensable for anyone interested in the sociology, anthropology and psychology of fashion, cultural studies or the fashion industry.

Gianni Colombo


Gianni Colombo


$47.77


The pioneer of contemporary environmental practices and installations. The book is related to key moments in Colombo?s artistic course, spanning from 1959, the year he cofounded Gruppo T and first exhibited his work at the Galleria Azimut, to 1980, when he realized his first London environment at Hayward Gallery. Colombo?s practice aimed at overcoming the traditional notion of art as an object to contemplate in order to create work that requires the active involvement of the viewer. From his tactile pieces and works in motion of the late 1950, to his immersive light installations of the 1960 into his mature large-scale environments, he conceived art as the place for an experience which belongs to both the body and the mind. His investigation of space is led by this idea of changing the spectator?s conventional relationship with reality, both physically and psychically, encompassing also a broad dialogue with technology and architecture. ”

Brueghel's Heavy Dancers


Brueghel’s Heavy Dancers


$38.58


Erudite, perceptive, and witty, as always, John Friedman shows the social implications and symbolism of medieval clothing. Paul Freedman, Yale UniversityWith a sharp eye for fashion and an astute analysis of cultural indicators permeating this body of literature, Friedman uncovers commonalities and contrasts, underscoring ways in which social status, and even fear in the face of change, were concerns that extended beyond national boundaries in medieval Europe. Geri L. Smith, author of The Medieval French Pastourelle TraditionWhat do Brueghel’s mid-sixteenth-century portrayals of heavy wedding dancers and feasters have in common with many late medieval poems and manuscript illustrations? Art historians have often treated Brueghel’s paintings, with their obsessive social detail, as if they heralded a set of cultural attitudes peculiar to the Early Modern period. Yet the way that the painter combines, in a single scene, scurrilous behavior with dress not only unsuited to the rustic status of the wearers but often sexually revealing, reflects attitudes toward clothing, class, and culture that are deeply medieval. In this expansive and highly original book, Friedman shows how conventional portrayals of obedient peasants, dating back to classical antiquity, were increasingly replaced in the Middle Ages by representations of realistic peasants, whose outrageous behavior betrayed their class while threatening those who stood above. Capacious in scope, the book covers poems from England, France, Germany, Italy, and Spain from the twelfth through the sixteenth centuries. In addition, Friedman draws on texts from various genres, particularly the pastourelle, giving readers the first panoramic approach to late medieval views of peasant clothing and certain related social behaviors such as eating, public excretion, brawling, and mooning. The book examines elite anxiety over the socially striving lower classes during a period in which social ident

Hitchcocks Cryptonymies


Hitchcocks Cryptonymies


$61.62


Tom Cohen’s radical exploration of Hitchcock’s cinema departs from conventional approaches-psychoanalytic, feminist, political-to emphasize the dense web of signatures and markings inscribed on and around his films. Aligning Hitchcock’s agenda with the philosophical and aesthetic writings of Nietzsche, Derrida, and Benjamin, Cohen’s project dramatically recasts the history and meaning of cinema itself. This first volume of Hitchcock’s Cryptonymies provides a singularly close reading of films such as The Lady Vanishes, Spellbound, and North by Northwest, exposing the often imperceptible visual and aural puns, graphic elements, and cryptograms that traverse his entire body of work. Within Hitchcock’s cinema, Cohen argues, these secret agents have more than just decorative or symbolic significance; they also reflect, critique, and disrupt traditional cinematic practice, undermining ways of seeing inherited from the Enlightenment and prefiguring postmodern culture. Cohen offers an unprecedented guide to the entirety of Hitchcock’s labyrinthine signature system.

Covered in Ink


Covered in Ink


$37.7


A small dolphin on the ankle, a black line on the lower back, a flower on the hip, or a child?s name on the shoulder blade?among the women who make up the twenty percent of all adults in the USA who have tattoos, these are by far the most popular choices. Tattoos like these are cute, small, and can be easily hidden, and they fit right in with society?s preconceived notions about what is? gender appropriate? for women. But what about women who are heavily tattooed? Or women who visibly wear imagery, like skulls, that can be perceived as masculine or ugly when inked on their skin? Drawing on autoethnography, and extensive interviews with heavily tattooed women, Covered in Ink provides insight into the increasingly visible subculture of women with tattoos. Author Beverly Thompson visits tattoos parlors, talking to female tattoo artists and the women they ink, and she attends tattoo conventions and Miss Tattoo pageants where heavily tattooed women congregate to share their mutual love for the art form. Along the way, she brings to life women?s love of ink, their very personal choices of tattoo art, and the meaning tattooing has come to carry in their lives, as well as their struggles with gender norms, employment discrimination, and family rejection. Thompson finds that, despite the stigma and social opposition heavily tattooed women face, many feel empowered by their tattoos and strongly believe they are creating a space for self-expression that also presents a positive body image. A riveting and unique study, Covered in Ink provides important insight into the often unseen world of women and tattooing.

Internet Culture


Internet Culture


$43.95


The internet has recently grown from a fringe cultural phenomenon to a significant site of cultural production and transformation. Internet Culture maps this new domain of language, politics and identity, locating it within the histories of communication and the public sphere. Internet Culture offers a critical interrogation of the sustaining myths of the virtual world and of the implications of the current mass migration onto the electronic frontier. Among the topics discussed in Internet Culture are the virtual spaces and places created by the citizens of the Net and their claims to the hotly contested notion of “virtual community”; the virtual bodies that occupy such spaces; and the desires that animate these bodies. The contributors also examine the communication medium behind theworlds of the Net, analyzing the rhetorical conventions governing online discussion, literary antecedents, and potential pedagogical applications.

Events In London


Events In London


$22.81


Purchase includes free access to book updates online and a free trial membership in the publisher’s book club where you can select from more than a million books without charge. Chapters: Events at Wembley Stadium, Events at the Royal Albert Hall, Festivals in London, 1966 Fifa World Cup Final, 1948 Summer Olympics, Turner Prize, Eurovision Song Contest 1968, the Proms, Summerslam, List of Turner Prize Winners and Nominees, England V Hungary, 2007 Fa Cup Final, Miss World 1988, Sci-Fi-London, Miss World 1987, Music of the Spheres, Miss World 1985, Miss World 1984, Miss World 1981, 2008 Fa Cup Final, Dance Umbrella, Miss World 1983, Miss World 1979, Miss World 1982, Miss World 1986, Notting Hill Carnival, Miss World 1980, Wireless Festival, Miss World 1978, London Film Festival, 2000 Fa Cup Final, Miss World 1975, Miss World 1970, Lovebox Festival, Miss World 1977, London Design Festival, London to Brighton Veteran Car Run, Lord Mayor’s Show, Miss World 1976, Spitalfields Music, Frieze Art Fair, Birds Eye View, Miss World 1974, Wembley Cup, Leefest, Miss World 1973, London to Brighton Events, 2011 Uefa Champions League Final, the Secret Policeman’s Ball 2006, Asia House Festival of Asian Literature, Bbc Electric Proms, Miss World 1971, Young London Into Music, Miglia Quadrato, Miss World 1972, Dunwich Dynamo, 1925 Fa Cup Final, Royal Tournament, Miss World 1969, Waltham Forest Festival of Theatre, London Games Festival, Zoo Art Fair, the Secret Policeman’s Ball 2008, Festival of Empire, Ufc 38, International Poetry Incarnation, Equinox Festival, City of London Festival, the Cans Festival, Big Gay Out, Mind Body Spirit Festival, Windsor Castle Royal Tattoo, Breakin’ Convention, Cybersonica, Londinium Pedo, London Book Fair, Carnaval Del Pueblo, London Lesbian and Gay Film Festival, Get Loaded in the Park, Pageant of Labour, Inside Out Festival, Carnival de Cuba, Angel Film Festival. Excerpt: The Proms, more formally known as Th. More:

Festivals In London


Festivals In London


$19.99


Purchase includes free access to book updates online and a free trial membership in the publisher’s book club where you can select from more than a million books without charge. Chapters: Turner Prize, the Proms, List of Turner Prize Winners and Nominees, Sci-Fi-London, Dance Umbrella, Notting Hill Carnival, Wireless Festival, London Film Festival, Lovebox Festival, London Design Festival, London to Brighton Veteran Car Run, Lord Mayor’s Show, Spitalfields Music, Frieze Art Fair, Birds Eye View, Leefest, London to Brighton Events, Asia House Festival of Asian Literature, Bbc Electric Proms, Young London Into Music, Miglia Quadrato, Dunwich Dynamo, Royal Tournament, Waltham Forest Festival of Theatre, London Games Festival, Zoo Art Fair, Festival of Empire, Equinox Festival, City of London Festival, the Cans Festival, Big Gay Out, Mind Body Spirit Festival, Windsor Castle Royal Tattoo, Breakin’ Convention, Cybersonica, Londinium Pedo, London Book Fair, Carnaval Del Pueblo, London Lesbian and Gay Film Festival, Get Loaded in the Park, Pageant of Labour, Inside Out Festival, Carnival de Cuba, Angel Film Festival. Excerpt: The Angel Film Festival is an annual independent film festival that takes places in Islington, London. The festival seeks to support London- and UK-based makers of independent film, as well as to provide a relaxed environment for London film goers to enjoy movies that would not traditionally be screened in London. The festival was launched in 2006.Websites (URLs online) A hyperlinked version of this chapter is at The Asia House Festival of Asian Literature, is the first and only Literary festival in the UK dedicated to writing about Asia. The Festival focuses on the newest and best books about Asia or Asians in an annual series of talks and discussions. Featured are fiction and non-fiction, written by Asians or non-Asians, covering a broad selection of Asian countries from The Gulf in the West, to Indonesia in the East. Believing that the

Modern Bodies


Modern Bodies


$40.85


In 1930, dancer and choreographer Martha Graham proclaimed the arrival of dance as an art of and from America. Dancers such as Doris Humphrey, Ted Shawn, Katherine Dunham, and Helen Tamiris joined Graham in creating a new form of dance, and, like other modernists, they experimented with and argued over their aesthetic innovations, to which they assigned great meaning. Their innovations, however, went beyond aesthetics. While modern dancers devised new ways of moving bodies in accordance with many modernist principles, their artistry was indelibly shaped by their place in society. Modern dance was distinct from other artistic genres in terms of the people it attracted: white women (many of whom were Jewish), gay men, and African American men and women. Women held leading roles in the development of modern dance on stage and off; gay men recast the effeminacy often associated with dance into a hardened, heroic, American athleticism; and African Americans contributed elements of social, African, and Caribbean dance, even as their undervalued role defined the limits of modern dancers’ communal visions. Through their art, modern dancers challenged conventional roles and images of gender, sexuality, race, class, and regionalism with a view of American democracy that was confrontational and participatory, authorial and populist. Modern Bodies exposes the social dynamics that shaped American modernism and moved modern dance to the edges of society, a place both provocative and perilous.

Modern Art


Modern Art


$14.49


There are many different kinds of art. The very definition of art is to cause or create a reaction. Modern Art is not exactly the most conventional, ethical, or down right moral way of presenting one’s expression-that particular expression being the use of the human form. The bone structure, the pearlescent gleam of the spine, the spattering swirl of intestines pink and blue, glittering ivory teeth when pulled out one by one makes for an exemplary piece of unique design, all created by the sheer genius behind the blade. You say mutilation? No, it is creation! Skin looks good on one’s body, yes, but it looks even better as a lamp shade, or a coaster. Now that’s putting your heart into your work. And when someone decides to use the human body for display, an eye ball here, a muscle there, all sorts of creativity can come about! Art causes a reaction, yes? Fear no art.

Art of Happiness


Art of Happiness


$23.95


The Barnes & Noble ReviewIn recent months, numerous new books have attempted to draw connections between the traditions of East and West, particularly between Buddhist philosophy and spiritual practice and contemporary psychological thought. Most of these books have been written by conventionally educated Western psychologists and psychiatrists who have sought to fill in what are perceived as gaps in their practices – the sense that their scientific and medical knowledge just can’t explain everything – by turning to some aspect of Eastern spiritual practice, whether meditation or Zen or other forms of Buddhist philosophy. Dr. Howard Cutler, an Arizona-based psychiatrist and the author of The Art of Happiness: A Handbook for Living, is no exception to this trend. What makes his book unique, however, is Dr. Cutler’s source for the Buddhist thought he explores: his coauthor, Tenzin Gyatso, His Holiness the Fourteenth Dalai Lama, the spiritual and temporal leader of the people of Tibet. Through a series of in-depth conversations with the Dalai Lama, and through a number of the Dalai Lama’s public addresses, Dr. Cutler explores what Tibetan Buddhism might have to offer to Western conceptions of happiness. Dr. Cutler begins with the Dalai Lama’s words on the subject: “I believe that the very purpose of our life is to seek happiness. That is clear. Whether one believes in religion or not, whether one believes in this religion or that religion, we are all seeking something better in life. So, I think, the very motion of our life is toward happiness.” As their furtherconversationreveals, however, Western notions of happiness have become confused with pleasure and the satisfaction of desire. Only by separating happiness from less durable forms of contentment can we truly achieve the happiness that the Dalai Lama believes is the goal of our lives: “.from

24 Hours Of Le Mans


24 Hours Of Le Mans


$14.14


Purchase includes free access to book updates online and a free trial membership in the publisher’s book club where you can select from more than a million books without charge. Chapters: Ford Gt40, 24 Hours of le Mans, List of 24 Hours of le Mans Winners, List of 24 Hours of le Mans Fatal Accidents, le Mans, le Mans Prototype, Group 5, 1955 le Mans Disaster, Triple Crown of Motorsport, Group 4, le Mans 24 Hours Video Games, the Race, le Mans Classic, Group 3, Truth in 24, le Mans Legend, Norbert Singer, Michel Vaillant, 24 Heures D’amant. Excerpt: The 1955 Le Mans disaster occurred during the 1955 24 Hours of Le Mans when a racing car involved in an accident flew into the crowd, killing the driver (Pierre Levegh ) and between 80-120 spectators. A further 100 people were injured in the accident. In terms of human toll, it is the most catastrophic accident in motorsports history. Before the accident Pierre Levegh, aged 50, had been hired by Mercedes-Benz as a factory driver that year. Part of his appeal to Mercedes was his determination shown in the 1952 race when he had driven for 23 straight hours. He had been leading due to not having taken the time to switch drivers, even though he did have a driver who could have replaced him. He failed to win only because of a missed gear change, resulting in engine failure, in the final hour of the race. Mercedes had also debuted its new 300 SLR sportscar in the 1955 World Sportscar Championship season, with some notable success, including a win at the Mille Miglia. The 300 SLR featured a body made of an ultralightweight magnesium alloy called Elektron with a specific gravity of just 1.8 (for reference, aluminium has a S.G. of 2.7 and steel 7.8). This body lowered the overall weight of the car, improving performance. The car, however, lacked the contemporary state-of-the-art disc brakes featured on the rival Jaguar D-Type, employing instead the conventional drum brake system. The high power of the car forced

Birth of an Industry


Birth of an Industry


$103.45


In Birth of an Industry, Nicholas Sammond describes how popular early American cartoon characters were derived from blackface minstrelsy. He charts the industrialization of animation in the early twentieth century, its representation in the cartoons themselves, and how important blackface minstrels were to that performance, standing in for the frustrations of animation workers. Cherished cartoon characters, such as Mickey Mouse and Felix the Cat, were conceived and developed using blackface minstrelsy’s visual and performative conventions: these characters are not like minstrels; they are minstrels. They play out the social, cultural, political, and racial anxieties and desires that link race to the laboring body, just as live minstrel show performers did. Carefully examining how early animation helped to naturalize virulent racial formations, Sammond explores how cartoons used laughter and sentimentality to make those stereotypes seem not only less cruel, but actually pleasurable. Although the visible links between cartoon characters and the minstrel stage faded long ago, Sammond shows how important those links are to thinking about animation then and now, and about how cartoons continue to help to illuminate the central place of race in American cultural and social life.

Integrative Oncology


Integrative Oncology


$67.99


Donald I Abrams, Andrew Weil, NOOK Book (eBook) – 2, Edition: 2,Series: Weil Integrative Medicine Library, English-language edition, Pub by Oxford University Press on 08-06-2014

Pentax HD Pentax DA 35mm f/2.8 Macro Limited Lens (Black)


Pentax HD Pentax DA 35mm f/2.8 Macro Limited Lens (Black)


$492.39


The black HD Pentax DA 35mm f/2.8 Macro Limited Lens from Pentax is a prime normal-length lens providing a 35mm-equivalent focal length of 53.5mm. Its macro designation enables a 1:1 magnification ratio for creating life-size imagery as close as 5.5 away. A high-grade multi-layer HD coating has been applied to lens elements to help minimize flare and ghosting for enhanced contrast, clarity, and color fidelity and a nine-blade diaphragm contributes to an aesthetic out-of-focus quality to benefit shallow depth of field imagery. Additionally, an SP Protect coating has also been applied to the front lens element to effectively protect it from dirt, oil, and finger prints.

Acupressure's Potent Points


Acupressure’s Potent Points


$19.6


With your hands you have potential to relieve everyday aches, pains and ailments without taking drugs, to improve your health, and to increase your vitality. Acupressure is an ancient healing art that uses the fingers to stimulate key points on the skin that, in turn, activate the body’s natural self-healing processes. With this book, it is a skill you can learn now-and use in your own home. In Acupressure’s Potent Points, Michael Reed Gach, founder and director of the Acupressure Institute of America, reveals simple techniques that enable you to relieve headaches, arthritis, colds and flu, insomnia, backaches, hiccups, leg pain, hot flashes, depression, and more-using the power and sensitivity of your own hands. This practical guide covers more than forty ailments and symptoms, from allergies to wrist pain, providing pressure-point maps and exercises to relieve pain and restore function. Acupressure complements conventional medical care, and enables you to take a vital role in becoming well and staying well. With this book you can turn your hands into healing tools-and start feeling good now.

Power of Art


Power of Art


$12.48


All art is subversive,” Pablo Picasso once declared. In The Power of Art, cultural historian Simon Schama emphatically agrees. “Great art,” he notes, “has dreadful manners. The hushed reverence of the gallery can fool you into believing masterpieces are polite things; visions that soothe, charm and beguile, but actually they are thugs. Merciless and wily, the greatest paintings grab you in a headlock, rough up your composure, and then proceed in short order to rearrange your sense of reality.” This powerful, full-bodied book zeroes in on eight gifted artistic thugs (Bernini, Caravaggio, Rembrandt, David, Turner, Van Gogh, Picasso, and Rothko) and their convention-breaking creations.

Hideous Progeny


Hideous Progeny


$66.36


Twisted bodies, deformed faces, aberrant behavior, and abnormal desires characterized the hideous creatures of classic Hollywood horror, which thrilled audiences with their sheer grotesqueness. Most critics have interpreted these traits as symptoms of sexual repression or as metaphors for other kinds of marginalized identities, yet Angela M. Smith conducts a richer investigation into the period’s social and cultural preoccupations. She finds instead a fascination with eugenics and physical and cognitive debility in the narrative and spectacle of classic 1930s horror, heightened by the viewer’s desire for visions of vulnerability and transformation. Reading such films as Dracula (1931), Frankenstein (1931), Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde (1931),Freaks (1932), and Mad Love (1935) against early-twentieth-century disability discourse and propaganda on racial and biological purity, Smith showcases classic horror’s dependence on the narratives of eugenics and physiognomics. She also notes the genre’s conflicted and often contradictory visualizations. Smith ultimately locates an indictment of biological determinism in filmmakers’ visceral treatments, which take the impossibility of racial improvement and bodily perfection to sensationalistic heights. Playing up the artifice and conventions of disabled monsters, filmmakers exploited the fears and yearnings of their audience, accentuating both the perversity of the medical and scientific gaze and the debilitating experience of watching horror. Classic horror films therefore encourage empathy with the disabled monster, offering captive viewers an unsettling encounter with their own impairment. Smith’s work profoundly advances cinema and disability studies, in addition to general histories concerning the construction of social and political attitudes toward the Other.

Hideous Progeny


Hideous Progeny


$120.74


Twisted bodies, deformed faces, aberrant behavior, and abnormal desires characterized the hideous creatures of classic Hollywood horror, which thrilled audiences with their sheer grotesqueness. Most critics have interpreted these traits as symptoms of sexual repression or as metaphors for other kinds of marginalized identities, yet Angela M. Smith conducts a richer investigation into the period’s social and cultural preoccupations. She finds instead a fascination with eugenics and physical and cognitive debility in the narrative and spectacle of classic 1930s horror, heightened by the viewer’s desire for visions of vulnerability and transformation. Reading such films as Dracula (1931), Frankenstein (1931), Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde (1931),Freaks (1932), and Mad Love (1935) against early-twentieth-century disability discourse and propaganda on racial and biological purity, Smith showcases classic horror’s dependence on the narratives of eugenics and physiognomics. She also notes the genre’s conflicted and often contradictory visualizations. Smith ultimately locates an indictment of biological determinism in filmmakers’ visceral treatments, which take the impossibility of racial improvement and bodily perfection to sensationalistic heights. Playing up the artifice and conventions of disabled monsters, filmmakers exploited the fears and yearnings of their audience, accentuating both the perversity of the medical and scientific gaze and the debilitating experience of watching horror. Classic horror films therefore encourage empathy with the disabled monster, offering captive viewers an unsettling encounter with their own impairment. Smith’s work profoundly advances cinema and disability studies, in addition to general histories concerning the construction of social and political attitudes toward the Other.

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